2019 New Coronavirus-Wuhan, China

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2019 New Coronavirus

(There is an ongoing investigation to make more decisions about this epidemic. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available. 2019-nCoV Status Summary)

The 2019 New Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus (more specifically a coronavirus) that was first identified as the cause of a respiratory disease outbreak detected in Wuhan, China. Initially, most of the outbreaks in Wuhan were reported to have some ties to a large seafood and animal market. However, an increasing number of patients are not exposed to animal markets, suggesting spread from person to person. Currently, how easily or sustainably this virus spreads among people is unclear. The latest status summary updates are available on CDC’s 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China website.

Symptoms

For confirmed 2019-nCoV infections, the reported diseases range from people with little or no symptoms to severely ill and dying people. Symptoms can include:

  • Fire
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

CDC currently believes that 2019-nCoV symptoms can occur within 2 days or 14 days after exposure. This is based on what was previously seen as the incubation period of MERS viruses.

How to spread 2019-nCoV

Not much is known about how a new coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, is spreading. The available information is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different animal species, including camels, cattle, cats and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect humans and then spread among people like MERS, SARS, and now 2019-nCoV.

Often, person-to-person spread occurs between close contacts (about 6 feet). Spread from person to person is thought to occur mainly when respiratory drops are produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how the flu and other respiratory pathogens spread. These droplets can descend into the mouths or noses of people nearby or possibly inhaled into the lungs. It is uncertain whether a person can get 2019-nCoV by touching a currently infected surface or object and then touching their mouth, nose, or possibly eyes.

Typically, in most respiratory viruses, people are considered to be the most contagious when they are the most symptomatic (the most ill). However, it spreads from close contact with an infected patient who has no signs of external symbol reports with 2019-nCoV  .

It is important to note how easily a virus spreads from person to person. Some viruses are highly contagious (such as measles), while other viruses are less. More information and research continues on transferability, seriousness and other features associated with 2019-nCoV. This information will further inform the risk assessment. Read the  latest 2019 Roman Coronavirus, Wuhan, China situation summary  .

Prevention

There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid exposure to this virus. However, as a reminder, the CDC always recommends daily preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue into the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touching objects and surfaces.

Treatment

No specific antiviral therapy is recommended for 2019-nCoV infection. People infected with 2019-nCoV should receive supportive care to alleviate symptoms. In severe cases, treatment should be careful to support vital organ functions.

People who think they may be exposed to 2019-nCoV should contact your healthcare provider immediately.

What to do if you are sick with 2019 Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)?

Recently returning travelers from China

If you have been in China in the past 14 days and have had a fever, cough, or trouble breathing, you should:

  • Get medical attention immediately. Before going to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell about your recent trip and symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Hastaken is not traveling.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief or arm (not with your hands) while coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to prevent the virus from spreading to others. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

Steps to help prevent the spread of 2019-nCoV if you are sick

If you have 2019-nCoV disease, follow the steps below to prevent 2019-nCoV from spreading to people in your home and community.

Stay home, except for medical advice

You should not leave your home, except for medical assistance. Do not go to work, school or public places and do not use public transport or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people in your home

You should stay in a different room than other people in your home whenever possible. In addition, you should use a separate bathroom, if any.

Call in advance before visiting your doctor

Before your medical appointment, call your healthcare provider and tell them you have a 2019-nCoV infection or it has been evaluated. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected.

Wear a face mask

You should wear a face mask when you are in the same room with other people and visit a healthcare professional. If you cannot wear a face mask, people living with you should wear one while in the same room as you.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief when you cough or sneeze, or you can cough or sneeze on your arm. Put the used tissues in a lined bin and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Wash your hands

Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there is no soap and water, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing household items

You should not share dishes, glasses, cups, dinnerware, towels, bedding or other items with other people in your home. After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water.

Monitor your symptoms

Get medical help quickly if your illness is getting worse (for example, if you have trouble breathing). C  Prepare all healthcare providers in advance and tell them that there is or is a 2019-nCoV infection. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected.

Avoid contact with pets and other animals

Do not touch pets or other animals while Hastak. Although there are no reports of pets or other animals getting sick with 2019-nCoV, various types of coronavirus can cause disease in animals and spread among animals and humans. Until you learn more, avoid contact with animals and wear a face mask if you need to be around the animals or take care of a pet.

Basics of the Disease

Q: What is the 2019 Roman Coronavirus?

A: 2019 New Coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV, is a new respiratory virus originally identified in Wuhan, China’s Hubei Province.

Q: What is a new coronavirus? 

A: A new coronavirus (nCoV) is a new coronavirus not previously described. The 2019 new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is not the same as coronaviruses that circulate widely among people and cause mild disease, such as the common cold.

Diagnosis of coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43 or HKU1 is not the same as for 2019-nCoV diagnosis. These are different viruses and patients with 2019-nCoV will be evaluated and treated differently than patients with a common coronavirus diagnosis.

Q: What is the source of 2019-nCoV?

A: Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of 2019-nCoV. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some of which cause diseases circulating in humans and among animals, including camels, cats and bats. Analysis of the genetic tree of this virus continues to know the specific source of the virus. SARS, another coronavirus that appeared to infect humans, came from musk cats, while MERS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect humans, came from camels.

Q: How does the virus spread?

A: This virus probably originated from an animal source initially, but now it seems to be spreading from person to person. It is important to remember that spreading from person to person may be in a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (such as measles), while other viruses are less. Currently, how easily or sustainably this virus spreads among people is unclear.

Q: Is 2019-nCoV the same as MERS-CoV or SARS virus?

A: No. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some of which cause diseases circulating in humans and among animals, including camels, cats and bats. The recently emerging 2019-nCoV is not the same as the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) or the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). However, genetic analysis shows that this virus originated from a virus associated with SARS. There is ongoing research for more information. This is a rapidly evolving situation, and the information will be updated as it becomes available.

Prevention

Q: How can I help protect myself?

A: We mentioned a little above to learn how to protect yourself from respiratory diseases like 2019-nCoV.

Q: What should I do when I have close contact with someone who has 2019-nCoV?

A: There is information for people who have been in close contact with someone who has been confirmed or evaluated for a 2019-nCoV infection online.

Prevention Steps for Persons Who Have Been Approved or Evaluated for Home Care 2019-nCoV Infection

Your doctors and public health personnel will evaluate whether you can care at home. If it is determined that you can be isolated at home, you will be monitored by staff in your local or state health department. You should follow the prevention steps below until a healthcare provider or local or state health department says you can return to your normal activities.

Stay home, except for medical advice

Apart from taking medical care, you should restrict activities outside your home. Do not go to work, school or public places and do not use public transport or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people in your home

You should stay in a different room than other people in your home whenever possible. In addition, you should use a separate bathroom, if any.

Call in advance before visiting your doctor

Before your medical appointment, call your healthcare provider and tell them you have a 2019-nCoV infection or it has been evaluated. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected.

Wear a face mask

You should wear a face mask when you are in the same room with other people and visit a healthcare professional. If you cannot wear a face mask, people living with you should wear one while in the same room as you.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief when you cough or sneeze, or you can cough or sneeze on your arm. Put the used tissues in a lined bin and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Wash your hands

Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there is no soap and water, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing household items

You should not share dishes, glasses, cups, dinnerware, towels, bedding or other items with other people in your home. After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water.

Monitor your symptoms

If your illness worsens, get medical attention immediately (eg shortness of breath). Before going to your medical appointment   , call your healthcare provider and tell them you have had a 2019-nCoV infection or been evaluated. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected. Ask your healthcare provider to call your local or state health department.

Prevention Steps for Carers and Household Members

If you live at home or provide home care with someone who has had a 2019-nCoV infection or evaluated, you should:

  • Make sure you understand and help the person follow the healthcare provider’s medication and care instructions. You should help the person with basic needs at home and provide support for food, prescriptions and other personal needs.
  • Have only the people who are required to care for the person at home.
    • Other household members must remain in another house or place of residence. If this is not possible, he should stay in another room or leave as much as possible. If available, use a separate bathroom.
    • Restrict visitors who don’t need to be home.
    • Older people and those who compromise immune systems or chronic health conditions should be kept away from the person. This includes chronic heart, lung or kidney conditions, and people with diabetes.
  • Make sure that the shared areas in the house have a good airflow that allows for weather conditions such as air conditioning or an open window.
  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there is no soap and water, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wear a disposable face mask, gown and gloves when you touch or touch the person’s blood, body fluids, and / or secretions such as sweat, saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomiting, urine, or diarrhea.
    • Dispose of disposable face masks, gowns and gloves after use. Don’t use it again.
    • Wash your hands immediately after removing your face mask, dress, and gloves.
  • Avoid sharing household items. You should not share dishes, glasses, glasses, utensils, towels, bedding or other items with a person who has been confirmed to have a 2019-nCoV infection. You must wash them thoroughly after using them (see below “Wash the laundry thoroughly”).
  • Clean all “high contact” surfaces daily, such as benches, table tops, door knockers, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may contain blood, body fluids, and / or secretions or excretions.
    • Read the label of cleaning products and follow the suggestions given on the product labels. The labels contain instructions for the safe and effective use of the cleaning product, including the use of gloves or aprons when using the product, and the measures you must take to ensure good ventilation during use.
    • Use a diluted bleach solution or a household disinfectant with a label that says “EPA approved”. To make a bleach solution at home, add 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 liter (4 cups) water. For a larger feed add 1 ¼ cup of bleach to 1 gallon (16 cups) of water.
  • Wash the laundry thoroughly.
    • Immediately remove and wash blood, body fluids, and / or clothing or beds that are excreted or excreted.
    • Wear disposable gloves while handling dirty laundry. Wash your hands immediately after removing your gloves.
    • Read and follow instructions on laundry or clothing and detergent labels. In general, wash and dry at the hottest temperatures recommended on the garment label.
  • Put used disposable gloves, aprons, face masks, and other contaminated products in a striped container before discarding them with other household waste. Wash your hands immediately after using these items.
  • Monitor the person’s symptoms. If they get sick, call their medical provider and tell them that the person has a 2019-nCoV infection or is being evaluated. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected. Ask the healthcare provider to call your local or state health department.
  • Carers and household members who do not take precautions while in close contact with a person who has been confirmed or evaluated by the 2019-nCoV infection are considered “close contact” and should monitor their health. Follow the prevention steps for the close touch points below.
  • Discuss your additional questions with your state or local health department

Prevention Steps for Close People

If you have had close contact with someone who has been confirmed or rated to be a 2019-nCoV infection, you should:

  • Monitor your health, starting from the day your first contact with the person begins, and continue 14 days after having close contact with the person. Pay attention to these signs and symptoms:
    • Fire. Take your temperature twice a day.
    • Umbrella.
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.
    • Other early symptoms that need attention are tremors, body aches, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, nausea / vomiting, and runny nose.
  • If fever or any of these symptoms develop, call your doctor right away.
  • Before going to your medical appointment   , be sure to inform your healthcare provider of your close contact with someone who has been confirmed to have had a 2019-nCoV infection or been evaluated. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to prevent others from getting infected. Ask your healthcare provider to call your local or state health department.
  • If you do not have any symptoms, you can continue your daily activities such as going to work, school or other common areas.

Q: Does CDC recommend using face mask in the community to prevent 2019-nCoV?

A: No. CDC currently does not recommend using face masks among the public. Although limited person-to-person spread has been detected between close contacts, this virus is not currently spreading in the community in the U.S. 

Medical information

Q: What are the symptoms and complications that 2019-nCoV can cause?

A: Current symptoms reported for 2019-nCoV patients include fever, cough and difficulty breathing, and mild to severe respiratory disease.

Q: Should I be tested for 2019-nCoV?

A:  If you develop symptoms of a fever 1 and cough or shortness of breath within 14 days after traveling from China  , you should call a healthcare professional in advance and talk about your last trip or close contact.  If someone who has recently traveled from this area has 2 in close contact with those who show these symptoms  , you should call a healthcare professional in advance and talk about your close contact and your last trips. Your healthcare provider will work with your state’s public health department and CDC to determine if you need to be tested for 2019-nCoV.

Q: How do you test a person for 2019-nCoV?

A: Currently, diagnostic testing for 2019-nCoV can only be done on CDC.

State and local health ministries that identify an investigator (PUI) should immediately notify the CDC Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to report the PUI and determine if the 2019-nCoV test is specified on the CDC. EOC will assist local / state health departments to collect, store and ship samples according to the CDC, including working hours or weekends / holidays.

Q: What should healthcare professionals and health departments do?

A: For suggestions and guidance on patients under investigation; infection control, including personal protective equipment guidance; home care and isolation; and case study …

Public Health Intervention and Current Status

Q: What does CDC do about 2019-nCoV?

A: This is an emerging and rapidly evolving situation, and the CDC will continue to provide updated information as it becomes available. CDC works 24/7 to protect people’s health. When there is a potential public health problem, the CDC’s job is to worry and act fast.

Q:  Am I at risk of new coronavirus from a package or products shipped from China?

There is still much unknown about the emerging 2019 new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) and how it is spread. Two other coronaviruses have previously appeared to cause serious diseases (MERS and SARS) in humans. 2019-nCoV is more genetically related to SARS than MERS, but both are betacoronaviruses that have their origins in bats. While we are not sure that this virus will behave in the same way as SARS and MERS, we can use information from both of these previous coronaviruses to guide us. In general, due to the weakness of these coronaviruses on the surfaces, the risk of spreading from products or packaging sent within days or weeks at ambient temperatures is very low. Coronaviruses are generally thought to spread most commonly by respiratory droplets.

Travel

Q: Is it safe to travel to China or other countries where 2019-nCoV cases occur?

A: The situation is changing.  Stay up to date with the CDC’s travel health reports about this epidemic . These notifications will be updated as more information is available.

Q: I recently traveled to China and got sick?

A: If you are in China and have difficulty in fever, cough or breathing, within 14 days of leaving,

  • Get medical attention immediately. Before going to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell about your recent trip and symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Hastaken is not traveling.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a handkerchief or arm (not with your hands) while coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to prevent the virus from spreading to others. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

2019-nCoV and Animals

Q: What about animal or animal products imported from China?

There is no evidence that CDC imports animals or animal products from China poses a risk for the 2019-nCoV spread in the USA. This is a rapidly evolving situation, and the information will be updated as it becomes available.

Q: Should I be worried about pets or other animals and 2019-nCoV?

Although this virus appears to have originated from an animal source, it is now spreading from person to person. CDC, both live and people traveling to China also suggest to stay away from dead animals, but there is no reason to think that any animal or pet in Turkey can be a source of infection with the new coronavirus.

: If I am ill, should I avoid contact with pets or other animals?

Do not touch pets or other animals while Hastak. Although there are no reports of pets or other animals getting sick with 2019-nCoV, various types of coronavirus can cause disease in animals and spread among animals and humans. Until you learn more, avoid contact with animals and wear a face mask if you need to be around the animals or take care of a pet.

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